INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE

MATHEMATICAL OPTIMIZATION THEORY AND OPERATIONS RESEARCH

(MOTOR 2019)

JULY 8–12, 2019, EKATERINBURG
© alshevskix.livejournal.com

ABOUT THE CONFERENCE

International conference “Mathematical Optimization Theory and Operations Research” (MOTOR2019) http://motor2019.uran.ru will be held on July 8-12, 2019, in a picturesque place near Ekaterinburg, Russia, at the borderline between Europe and Asia.

The conference brings together a wide research community in the fields of mathematical programming and global optimization, discrete optimization, complexity theory and combinatorial algorithms, optimal control and games, and their applications in relevant practical problems of operations research, mathematical economy, and data analysis.

Important dates

Abstract submission due:
January 15, 2019
February 1, 2019
Full paper submission due:
February 1, 2019
February 15, 2019
Notification of acceptance:
March 15, 2019
Camera ready version:
April 2, 2019
Conference dates:
July 8-12, 2019

Previous events

MOTOR2019 is a descendant of a number of well-known International and All-Russian conferences, which were held in Ural, Siberia, and the Far East for a long time:

Conference name
Since
# in series
Last event

Baikal International Triennial School Seminar on Methods of Optimization and Their Applications, BITSS MOPT

1969

17

Mathematical Programming and Applications, MPA

1972

15

Discrete Optimization and Operations Research, DOOR

1996

9

Optimization Problems and their Applications, OPTA

1997

7

MAIN TOPICS

  • mathematical programming
  • global optimization
  • integer programming and combinatorial optimization
  • computational complexity, approximation algorithms, schemes, bounds, heuristics and metaheuristics
  • optimal control and game theory
  • optimization and approximation
  • optimization in machine learning and data analysis
  • applications in operations research: scheduling, routing, facility location, packing and cutting, manufacturing systems, etc.

COMMITTEES

Program Committee Chairs

Prof.   Michael Khachay
Krasovsky Inst. of Math. and Mech., Russia
Prof.   Yury Kochetov
Sobolev Inst. of Math., Russia
Prof.   Panos M. Pardalos
University of Florida, USA

Program Committee

(to be extended)

Prof. E. Amirgaliev
Suleyman Demirel University, Kazakhstan
Prof. A. Antipin
Dorodnicyn Computing Centre FRC CSC RAS, Russia
Prof. A. Bagirov
Federation University Australia, Australia
Prof. O. Battaia
ISAE-Supaero, Toulouse, France
Acad. V.I. Berdyshev
Krasovsky Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia
Prof. V. Beresnev
Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia
Dr. R. van Bevern
Novosibirsk State University, Russia
Prof. O. Burdakov
Linköping University, Sweden
Prof. S. Butenko
Texas A&M University, USA
Prof. T. Davidovic
Mathematical Institute SANU, Serbia
Prof. V. Deineko
Warwick University, GB
Prof. S. Dempe
Freiberg University, Germany
Prof. A. Dolgui
IMT Atlantique, France
Prof. A. Eremeev
Dostoevsky Omsk State University, Russia
Acad. Y.G. Evtushenko
Dorodnicyn Computing Centre FRC CSC RAS, Russia
Prof. A. Erzin
Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia
Prof. F. Fomin
University of Bergen, Norway
Prof. E. Gimadi
Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia
Prof. A. Gornov
Matrosov Institute for System Dynamics and Control Theory SB RAS, Russia
Prof. A. Grigoriev
Maastricht University, Netherlands
Prof. M. Jacimovic
University of Montenegro, Montenegro
Prof. V. Kalashnikov
ITESM, Campus Monterrey, Mexico
Prof. V. Kalyagin
Higher School of Economics, Russia
Prof. A. Kel'manov
Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia
Prof. O. Khamisov
Melentiev Energy Systems Institute SB RAS, Russia
Prof. A. Kibzun
Moscow Aviation Institute, Russia
Prof. D. (David) Kim
Kennesaw State University, USA
Prof. I. Konnov
Kazan Federal University, Russia
Prof. A. Kononov
Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia
Prof. V. Kotov
Belarusian State University, Belarus
Prof. I. Kotsireas
University of Waterloo, Canada
Prof. M.Y. Kovalyov
United Institute of Informatics Problems NASB, Belarus
Prof. A. Lazarev
Trapeznikov Institute of Control Sciences RAS, Russia
Prof. V. Levit
Ariel University, Israel
Prof. B. M.T. Lin
National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
Prof. N. Lukoyanov
Krasovsky Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia
Prof. V. Mazalov
Institute of Applied Mathematical Research of KRC RAS, Russia
Prof. N. Mladenovic
Mathematical Institute SANU, Serbia
Prof. Y. Nikulin
University of Turku, Finland
Prof. E. Nurminski
Far Eastern Federal University, Russia
Prof. B.T. Polyak
Trapeznikov Institute of Control Science, Russia
Prof. L. Popov
Krasovsky Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia
Prof. M. Posypkin
Dorodnicyn Computing Centre, FRC CSC RAS, Russia
Prof. O. Prokopyev
University of Pittsburgh, USA
Prof. A. Pyatkin
Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia
Prof. S. Raha
Indian Institute of Science, India
Acad. K.V. Rudakov
Dorodnicyn Computing Centre FRC CSC RAS, Russia
Prof. K. Sabo
University of Osijek, Croatia
Prof. L. Sakalauskas
Univeristy of Vilnius, Lithuania
Prof. E. Semenkin
Reshetnev Siberian State University of Science and Technology, Russia
Prof. Y. Sergeev
University of Calabria, Italy
Prof. N. Shakhlevich
University of Leeds, GB
Prof. A. Sifaleras
University of Macedonia, Greece
Prof. V. Skarin
Krasovsky Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia
Prof. A. Strekalovsky
Matrosov Institute for System Dynamics and Control Theory SB RAS, Russia
Prof. V. Strusevich
University of Greenwich, GB
Prof. T. Tchemisova
University of Aveiro, Portugal
Prof. V.N. Ushakov
Krasovsky Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia
Prof. V.V. Vasin
Krasovsky Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Russia

Industry session chairs

Prof. D. Gainanov
Ural Federal University, Russia
Dr.  A. Kurochkin
Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia

Organizing Committee

Dr.  K. Kobylkin (chair)
Krasovsky Inst. of Math. and Mech., Russia
Dr.  N.A. Kochetova
Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia
Dr.  P.A. Kononova
Sobolev Institute of Mathematics, Russia
G.F. Kornilova
Krasovsky Inst. of Math. and Mech., Russia
M.A. Kostina
Krasovsky Inst. of Math. and Mech., Russia
Dr.  T. Medvedev
Higher School of Economics, Russia
Dr.  K. Neznakhina
Krasovsky Inst. of Math. and Mech., Russia
Y. Ogorodnikov
Krasovsky Inst. of Math. and Mech., Russia
M. Pasynkov
Krasovsky Inst. of Math. and Mech., Russia
Dr.  M. Poberiy
Krasovsky Inst. of Math. and Mech., Russia

INVITED SPEAKERS

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Prof. Olga Battaia

ISAE-Supaero, Toulouse
France

Decision under ignorance: a comparison of existing criteria in a context of linear programming

Abstract: Decision or optimization problems often arise in an uncertain context. Depending on available information, several approaches have been proposed to model this uncertainty. In this talk, we focus on the case of low knowledge on possible states, namely decision under ignorance. In this case the decision-maker is able to give the set of possible values of optimization problem parameters but she/he is not able to differentiate them. We compare a set of criteria that can be used in this case on the example of a linear programming problem and discuss some possible applications.


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Prof. Christoph Dürr

Sorbonne Université
France

Bijective analysis of online algorithms

Abstract: In the online computing framework the instance arrives in form a request sequence, every request must be served immediately, through a decision, which generates some cost. Think at the paging problem for memory caches. The goal in this research area is to identify the best strategy, also called online algorithm. Classically this is done through the competitive analysis, i.e. the performance of an online algorithm is compared with the optimal offline solution. The goal is to find an algorithm which minimizes this ratio over the worst case instance. You would say that algorithm A is better than algorithm B if it has a smaller ratio. However there are situations where two algorithms have the same ratio, still in practice one is better than the other. So people came up with a different technique to compare online algorithms directly with each other, rather than through the optimal offline solution. The bijective analysis is one of them. I would do a survey on this technique, and talk about a related personal work: Best-of-two-worlds analysis of online search, with Spyros Angelopoulos and Shendan Jin.


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Prof. Alexander Grigoriev

Maastricht University
Netherlands

A survey on possible and impossible attempts to solve the treewidth problem via ILPs

Abstract: We survey a number of integer programming formulations for the pathwidth and for the treewidth problems. The attempts to find good formulations for the problems span the period of 15 years, yet without any true success. Nevertheless, some formulations provide potentially useful frameworks for attacking these notorious problems. Some others are just curious and interesting fruits of mathematical imagination.


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Prof. Mikhail Kovalyov

United Institute of Informatics Problems NASB
Belarus

No-idle scheduling of unit-time jobs with release dates and deadlines on parallel machines

Abstract: While the problem of scheduling unit-time jobs with release dates and deadlines on parallel machines is polynomially solvable via a reduction to the assignment problem, the no-idle requirement destroys this reduction and makes the problem challenging. In the presentation, a number of properties of this problem are reported, and heuristic and optimal algorithms based on these properties are described.


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Prof. Vadim Levit

Ariel University
Israel

Critical and Maximum Independent Sets Revisited

Abstract: A set of vertices of a graph is independent if no two its vertices are adjacent. A set is critical if the difference between its size and the size of its neighborhood is maximum. Critical independent sets define an important area of research due to their close relationships with the well-known NP-hard problem of finding a maximum independent set. Actually, every critical independent set is contained in a maximum independent set, while a maximum critical independent set can be found in polynomial time. If S is an independent set such that there is a matching from its neighborhood into S, then it is a crown. It is known that every critical independent set forms a crown. A graph is König-Egerváry if every maximum independent set is a crown. Crowns are also accepted as important tools for fixed parameter tractable problems. For instance, the size of the vertex cover can be substantially reduced by deleting both the vertices of a crown and its neighborhood. In this presentation, we discuss various connections between unions and intersections of maximum (critical) independent sets of graphs, which lead to deeper understanding of crown structures, in general, and König-Egerváry graphs, in particular.


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Prof. Bertrand M.T. Lin

National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu
Taiwan

An Overview of the Relocation Problem

Abstract: The relocation problem is formulated from a municipal redevelopment project in east Boston. In its abstract form, the relocation problem incorporates a generalized resource constraint in which the amount of the resource returned by a completed activity is not necessarily the same as that the activity has acquired for commencing the processing. We will first introduce the connection of the relocation problem to flow shop scheduling. Several traditional scheduling models with the generalized resource constraints have been proposed investigated. We will review existing results, suggest new models and present several open questions.


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Prof. Angelo Sifaleras

University of Macedonia
Greece

Exterior Point Simplex-type Algorithms for Linear and Network Optimization Problems

Abstract: Two decades of research led to the development of a number of efficient algorithms that can be classified as exterior point simplex-type. This type of algorithms can cross over the infeasible region of the primal (dual) problem and find an optimal solution reducing the number of iterations needed. Thus, such approaches aim to find an efficient way to get to an optimal basis via a series of infeasible ones. In this lecture, we present the developments in exterior point simplex-type algorithms for linear and network optimization problems, over the recent years. We also present other approaches that, in a similar way, do not preserve primal or dual feasibility at each iteration such as the monotonic build-up Simplex algorithms and the criss-cross methods, and also discuss some open research problems.


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Prof. Vitaly Strusevich

University of Greenwich
United Kingdom

Design of Fully-Polynomial Approximation Schemes for Non-linear Boolean Programming Problems

Abstract: The talk is aimed at describing various techniques used for designing fully-polynomial approximation schemes (FPTAS) for problems of minimizing and maximizing non-linear non-separable functions of Boolean variables, either with no additional constraints or with linear knapsack constraints. Most of the reported results are on optimizing a special quadratic function known as the half-product, which has numerous scheduling applications. Besides, problems with a more general objective and nested linear constraints are considered and a design of an FPTAS based on the K-approximation calculus is discussed.


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Prof. Natalia Shakhlevich

University of Leeds
United Kingdom

TBA

Abstract: TBA

PAPER SUBMISSION

Authors are invited to submit their papers reporting on novel results that are not published or submitted simultaneously to any journal or another conference with refereed proceedings. Papers should be prepared in the Springer LNCS Format, can have 12-15 pages, and submitted in PDF. Please, follow the official Springer authors guidelines and LNCS Latex templates. All papers should be submitted through the easychair conference management system, which is available now.

Publication and Special Issues

Conference proceedings will be published by Springer Nature as volumes of Lecture Notes in Computer Science (LNCS) and Communications in Computer and Information Science (CCIS) series.

REGISTRATION FEES

Early bird (up to May 1)
On site
Student (undergraduate / graduate / PhD)
50 eur
60 eur
Regular
100 eur
125 eur

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

TBA

VENUE

The conference will be held in a picturesque place near Ekaterinburg, Russia, at the borderline between Europe and Asia